Blast from Demos Past: “Instead of Here”

I recently began following A Rich, Full Life In Spite of It and one of her recent posts really hit home.  (Go on – read it!)

Did you read it?  Ok, good.  Moving on.

I have a bad habit of boarding the “I’ll be happier when” train.  It’s something I’m working on, trying to seen the green in my own grass.

Tonight, I set up my keyboard and Mbox2 Mini with the intention of recording either a new song idea or a new take on an old one.  Since I haven’t been very active in my musical hobbies lately, I took a listen to a few rough demos I’ve recorded over the years and came across a song I wrote back in 2007.  The song was the result of an assignment in the Commercial Songwriting Techniques course I was taking at the time, an online course offered through Berkleemusic.  It’s called “Instead of Here” and, at the time, it was written as a sort of half-fictional autobiography (and I say half-fictional because at the time I wrote it I had only ever lived in my hometown).  It’s about wanting to leave my small hometown to live in the big city, and then, once living in the big city, wanting to go home.  In essence, it’s a song about the grass always seeming greener on the other side, wherever “the other side” may be.  (Self-fulfilling prophecy, you sneaky devil you!)

I can’t believe it’s been 5 years since I wrote “Instead of Here”.  The song exists in its original demo form, as recorded in the summer of 2007.  I recorded all the tracks using a Boss BR-8 digital recorder in my then-boyfriend’s and my spare bedroom/music room.  I remember feeling like I was going to pass out while I was recording the background vocals because it was so warm and stuffy in that small room, and the notes were much longer than I was used to exhaling.

In musical pursuits, as in life, I sometimes find it helpful to take a look back to see where I’ve been while I attempt to figure out where I’m going.  I thought I would share my looking back with you, in all its lackluster glory.

Quickly, before I change my mind, here it is:

Here’s to the green in our own grasses!